Rethinking Regenerative Agriculture

Regenerative Agriculture is a obscure term; it’s broadly defined, lacks a clear consensus and typically neglects hundreds of years of traditional land use practices embraced by BIPOC farmers. This article dives into the opaque, expanding and condensing nature of regenerative agriculture, and emphasizes not only the importance on the sciences of ecosystem health, but emphasizing the need to embrace racial justice, indigenous wisdom and equity as the paradigm is shifted towards a system that regenerates social, economic and environmentally food and resource practices.

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1 thought on “Rethinking Regenerative Agriculture”

  1. Farming and food systems are ever evolving.
    Historically on the farm end there have been 2 basic approaches. Dirt farming with chemistry/chemical formulas and Soil farming with biology/nature principles. Dirt and chem. measured fertility and Soil and biological health and functioning.

    Institutional ag. almost exclusively has focused on dirt chem. ag since ww2. Soil health has been almost exclusively done by farmers and a few independent researchers starting in the 60s. Before ww2 it was also done to some degree at institutions, too.

    Since the 60s we learned alot about the nature of soil and plant health as well as the ecosystem health. These insights are constantly changing practices. It’s happening so fast that by the time a new book is written, it’s alright out of date.

    Same as all the other names given at a point of time Regenerative is just the recent. As I mentioned farmers just keep working on advancing soil/plant/farm ecosystem health knowledge. Tweaking the nature-based principles that then guide practice changes.
    And new catchy names will continue to emerge and then get old and corrupted. Chemical inputs and plant genetic modifications should be identified. Same as ingredients in non whole food products.

    Everything else are food system issues for society to decide.

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